A Buddhist woman offers charity and prayers to the Mae Chees clad in white robes as they stand silently in the early morning light, holding out their alms bowls hoping for food or monetary offerings. Vanished by centuries the lineage of "Bhikkhu?nii" (Order of Nuns) has been brought to the ongoing Thai society's debate. White-clad thai nuns, who keep the eight precepts and have their heads and eyebrows shaved are known as the lon-existing "mae chees" (low category to call the lay nuns). Females who have turned to religous life, as renunciants, live ostracized and marginalized by the Sangha (Buddhist community) and Thai society, denying them full access to the monastic life as well as rights and support from the government. Today nunhood is not recognized by any asian country belong to the Theravada Buddhist order. Most of the eight precept holders live in temples run by male abbots, at the shadow of the monks; with the exceptional existence of a few para-monastic institutions as the Sathira Dhammasathan meditation centre, where "mae chees" are not allow to held a temple, but not denied to practice the spiritual life.
A Buddhist woman offers charity and prayers to the Mae Chees clad in white robes as they stand silently in the early morning light, holding out their alms bowls hoping for food or monetary offerings. Vanished by centuries the lineage of "Bhikkhu?nii" (Order of Nuns) has been brought to the ongoing Thai society's debate. White-clad thai nuns, who keep the eight precepts and have their heads and eyebrows shaved are known as the lon-existing "mae chees" (low category to call...
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Filename: "MAE CHEES" THE SPIRITUAL SUBORDINATION OF THAI FEMALE
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