Sub-Saharan illegal migrants reach through the window of a cell in the Garabuli detention centre, pleading for water, cigarettes, food and their release. <br />
The vacuum of power in Libya has made groups of migrants extremely vulnerable. For the rampant militias who have seized control of the country, they represent free-flowing cash. Groups of foreign nationals, including illegal migrants, asylum seekers and refugees, have become targets for a flourishing human market run by militia groups aligned with criminal networks, which use “detention centres” to re-sell and to distribute these groups via the networks of illegal trade. Smuggled and sold from other countries and/or bought in Europe, 40% of the illegal migrants and refugees in Libya attempt to cross the Mediterranean Sea. Unofficial figures estimate that there are three million foreign nationals in Libya today, and they live in fear of the militias who wield power. <br />
The Garabuli detention centre for illegal migrants and refugees is known as one of the biggest centres of its kind, housing hundreds of detainees of different backgrounds and nationalities, all of whom wait to be transferred (or ‘re-distributed’) to other facilities along the west coast of Libya.
Sub-Saharan illegal migrants reach through the window of a cell in the Garabuli detention centre, pleading for water, cigarettes, food and their release.
The vacuum of power in Libya has made groups of migrants extremely vulnerable. For the rampant militias who have seized control of the country, they represent free-flowing cash. Groups of foreign nationals, including illegal migrants, asylum seekers and refugees, have become targets for a flourishing human market run by militia...
more »

Filename: CONTRERAS_human_trafficking_07.jpg
Copyright